Intermittent Positive Reinforcement in Puzzle & Dragons

Intermittent Positive Reinforcement in Puzzle & DragonsI’ll freely admit it; I’m addicted to Puzzle & Dragons, and I’m certainly not the only one. I have clocked up my 211th consecutive day playing what reviewers have described as “portable crack“, and I’m surprised at that. There have been plenty of casual gaming titles that have kept me interested briefly, but nothing has come close to 211 consecutive days of logging on, without fail. When I needed to replace my phone, my PAD game state was the only thing I worried about backing up. How has it managed to keep me interested? By consistently and successfully applying principles of “intermittent positive reinforcement”.

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Android Drawable Instances – Don’t Share Them!

Android robotRecently I’ve been implementing an animated user interface where the animations are defined in a proprietary file format. When the interface is brought up on Androidâ„¢, the file gets walked and all the View objects created; when an animation takes place, the definitions in the file are converted into Android key frames. Everything seemed to work well… until I imported a file with what seemed like a harmless optimization.

Several buttons in the user interface incorporated a “glowing” effect, basically by having the glow defined in an image file and animating its alpha transparency. The same image file was in use at several locations on the screen, just scaled to match the button. I decided to cache the Android Drawable, creating just one for each image and attaching it to multiple ImageView objects as necessary. As I loaded the file, the repeated copies of the glow image appeared in several places on the screen. Surely this would be more efficient?

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Content, Creators, Consumers

Somewhere in the widget area of this site, you should now see a Creative Commons license. This touches on a subject I feel very strongly about; the idea of attribution, of giving credit where it is due. This affects not just the writing on this blog, but equally to the code I produce as a software developer, whether it be as part of a company or even tools I develop for myself.

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Finally Touch Typing With Dvorak

l never learned to type “properly” with a standard QWERTY keyboard. Oh, I gave it a try, getting hold of the Mavis Beacon software, circa 1992, and getting thoroughly frustrated typing nonsense like “fff jjj fjfj jjff” over and over again, never feeling like I was getting anywhere. Over the years, I’ve been able to achieve a respectable forty or fifty words per minute with two-fingered hunt and peck, although there hasn’t been a lot of hunting needed for years. “Eagle Finger” has sounded more appropriate. It never seemed likely I could get close enough to that kind of speed with disheartening touch typing exercises, and I never felt I needed to.

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Git With Subversion: The Trouble With Rebase

It wasn’t all that long ago that I was unfortunate enough to be working on projects whose idea of “version control” was merely to put all the source code in a shared network directory – thus failing to provide any notions of “version” or “control” whatsoever. Things are far more stable now; Subversion is widely used for projects that appreciate the idea of a centralized repository, while git appears to be the common choice for those looking for something distributed, with some remarkably powerful features. With the git svn bridge, developers can work locally (and even detached from the network) using git, and push their work to Subversion when needed. As a git convert, I would never return to straight SVN now; my first task when working on a Subversion project is to clone it with git. It appears to be a very common and successful workflow.

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